joy cometh in the morning.

(Psa 30:5 KJV)  For his anger endureth but a moment; in his favour is life: weeping may endure for a night, but joy cometh in the morning.
 
(Rev 7:17 KJV)  For the Lamb which is in the midst of the throne shall feed them, and shall lead them unto living fountains of waters: and God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes.
 
(Rev 21:4 KJV)  And God shall wipe away all tears from their eyes; and there shall be no more death, neither sorrow, nor crying, neither shall there be any more pain: for the former things are passed away.
 
  (Est 9:22 KJV)  As the days wherein the Jews rested from their enemies, and the month which was turned unto them from sorrow to joy, and from mourning into a good day: that they should make them days of feasting and joy, and of sending portions one to another, and gifts to the poor.
 
(Isa 35:10 KJV)  And the ransomed of the LORD shall return, and come to Zion with songs and everlasting joy upon their heads: they shall obtain joy and gladness, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.
 
(Isa 51:11 KJV)  Therefore the redeemed of the LORD shall return, and come with singing unto (THE HEAVENLY Zion; and everlasting joy shall be upon their head: they shall obtain gladness and joy; and sorrow and mourning shall flee away. 
 
(Psa 137:6 KJV)  If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy.
 
(Isa 65:14 KJV)  Behold, my servants shall sing for joy of heart, but ye shall cry for sorrow of heart, and shall howl for vexation of spirit.
 
(Jer 31:13 KJV)  Then shall the virgin rejoice in the dance, both young men and old together: for I will turn their mourning into joy, and will comfort them, and make them rejoice from their sorrow.
 
(John 16:20 KJV)  Verily, verily, I say unto you, That ye shall weep and lament, but the world shall rejoice: and ye shall be sorrowful, but your sorrow shall be turned into joy.
 
(John 16:22 KJV)  And ye now therefore have sorrow: but I will see you again, and your heart shall rejoice, and your joy no man taketh from you.
 
(Psa 5:11 KJV)  But let all those that put their trust in thee rejoice: let them ever shout for joy, because thou defendest them: let them also that love thy name be joyful in thee.
 
(Psa 16:11 KJV)  Thou wilt show me the path of life: in thy presence is fulness of joy; at thy right hand there are pleasures for evermore.
 
(Psa 21:1 KJV)   The king shall joy in thy strength, O LORD; and in thy salvation how greatly shall he rejoice!
 
(Psa 27:6 KJV)  And now shall mine head be lifted up above mine enemies round about me: therefore will I offer in his tabernacle sacrifices of joy; I will sing, yea, I will sing praises unto the LORD.
 
(Psa 32:11 KJV)  Be glad in the LORD, and rejoice, ye righteous: and shout for joy, all ye that are upright in heart.
 
(Psa 35:27 KJV)  Let them shout for joy, and be glad, that favour my righteous cause: yea, let them say continually, Let the LORD be magnified, which hath pleasure in the prosperity of his servant.
 
(Psa 42:4 KJV)  When I remember these things, I pour out my soul in me: for I had gone with the multitude, I went with them to the house of God, with the voice of joy and praise, with a multitude that kept holyday.
 
(Psa 43:4 KJV)  Then will I go unto the altar of God, unto God my exceeding joy: yea, upon the harp will I praise thee, O God my God.
 
(Psa 48:2 KJV)  Beautiful for situation, the joy of the whole earth, is mount Zion, on the sides of the north, the city of the great King.
 
(Psa 51:8 KJV)  Make me to hear joy and gladness; that the bones which thou hast broken may rejoice.
 
(Psa 51:12 KJV)  Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation; and uphold me with thy free spirit.
 
(Psa 65:13 KJV)  The pastures are clothed with flocks; the valleys also are covered over with corn; they shout for joy, they also sing.
 
(Psa 67:4 KJV)  O let the nations be glad and sing for joy: for thou shalt judge the people righteously, and govern the nations upon earth. Selah.
 
(Psa 105:43 KJV)  And he brought forth his people with joy, and his chosen with gladness:
 
(Psa 126:5 KJV)  They that sow in tears shall reap in joy.
 
(Psa 132:9 KJV)  Let thy priests be clothed with righteousness; and let thy saints shout for joy.
 
(Psa 132:16 KJV)  I will also clothe her priests with salvation: and her saints shall shout aloud for joy. 
 
Well we all do know that we also do experiences unexpected, unpredictable,  hail storms, with violent thunder too in our own life’s, where we are beset by negative events, negative circumstances and things are not going the way we had expected them too. And we are not sure if God still has things under his control and how we should react to these storms of life. Two persons will face the same events, and yet their attitudes, experiences may be totally different.. One person next  Rejoices over the events, and the other one is biiter over them. Why?
 
 (Heb 4:2 KJV)  For unto us was the gospel preached, as well as unto them: but the word preached did not profit them, not being mixed with faith in them that heard it. (Eccl 8:6 KJV)  Because to every purpose there is time and judgment, therefore the misery of man is great upon him.  (Eccl 8:11 KJV)  Because sentence against an evil work is not executed speedily, therefore the heart of the sons of men is fully set in them to do evil.12  Though a sinner do evil an hundred times, and his days be prolonged, yet surely I know that it shall be well with them that fear God, which fear before him:13   But it shall not be well with the wicked, neither shall he prolong his days, which are as a shadow; because he feareth not before God.
 
(Eccl 7:8 KJV)  Better is the end of a thing than the beginning thereof: and the patient in spirit is better than the proud in spirit.
 
(Eccl 7:9 KJV)  Be not hasty in thy spirit to be angry: for anger resteth in the bosom of fools.
 
(Job 33:4 KJV)  The spirit of God hath made me, and the breath of the Almighty hath given me life.Then as we trust God and also praise God we next will come through unscathed, victorious, and even learn the lesson that God has designed for us through the storm..
   
(Eccl 5:15 KJV)  As he came forth of his mother’s womb, naked shall he return to go as he came, and shall take nothing of his labour, which he may carry away in his hand.
  
(Eccl 12:13 KJV)  Let us hear the conclusion of the whole matter: Fear God, and keep his commandments: for this is the whole duty of man.

And we always need to remember that  (Eccl 2:26 KJV)  For God giveth to a man that is good in his sight wisdom, and knowledge, and joy: but to the sinner he giveth travail, to gather and to heap up, that he may give to him that is good before God. This also is ( for their) vanity and vexation of spirit.

 
(Eccl 3:1 KJV)  To every thing there is a season, and a time to every purpose under the heaven:
2  A time to be born, and a time to die; a time to plant, and a time to pluck up that which is planted;
3  A time to kill, and a time to heal; a time to break down, and a time to build up;
4  A time to weep, and a time to laugh; a time to mourn, and a time to dance;
5  A time to cast away stones, and a time to gather stones together; a time to embrace, and a time to refrain from embracing;
6  A time to get, and a time to lose; a time to keep, and a time to cast away;
7  A time to rend, and a time to sew; a time to keep silence, and a time to speak;
8  A time to love, and a time to hate; a time of war, and a time of peace.
 
(Eccl 9:12 KJV)  For man also knoweth not his time: as the fishes that are taken in an evil net, and as the birds that are caught in the snare; so are the sons of men snared in an evil time, when it falleth suddenly upon them.
 
(Eccl 7:14 KJV)  In the day of prosperity be joyful, but in the day of adversity consider: God also hath set the one over against the other, to the end that man should find nothing after him.
 
(Eccl 7:18 KJV)  It is good that thou shouldest take hold of this; yea, also from this withdraw not thine hand: for he that feareth God shall come forth of them all
 
In psalm 29 David describes a thunder­storm sweeping over the Palestinian countryside in a fury of lightning and thunder, accompanied by heavy rains and resultant flood and destruction.  Read it through and you will see that the Psalm as a whole is a graphic setting in which God seeks to instruct His children when they find themselves in circumstances comparable to such a storm-for example, the flames of the fire of testing, the rumbling thunder of fearful events and floods of unexpected reverses and innocent sufferings.

Psalm 29:1  A Psalm of David. Give unto the LORD, O ye mighty, give unto the LORD glory and strength.
2  Give unto the LORD the glory due unto his name; worship the LORD in the beauty of holiness.
3  The voice of the LORD is upon the waters: the God of glory thundereth: the LORD is upon many waters.
4  The voice of the LORD is powerful; the voice of the LORD is full of majesty.
5  The voice of the LORD breaketh the cedars; yea, the LORD breaketh the cedars of Lebanon.
6  He maketh them also to skip like a calf; Lebanon and Sirion like a young unicorn.
7  The voice of the LORD divideth the flames of fire.
8  The voice of the LORD shaketh the wilderness; the LORD shaketh the wilderness of Kadesh.
9  The voice of the LORD maketh the hinds to calve, and discovereth the forests: and in his temple doth every one speak of his glory.
10  The LORD sitteth upon the flood; yea, the LORD sitteth King for ever.
11  The LORD will give strength unto his people; the LORD will bless his people with peace.

  
Notice the Psalmist’s eloquent language:
The voice” of the Lord is upon the waters…. The voice of the Lord is powerful; the voice of the Lord is full of majesty. The voice of the Lord breaketh the ce­dars      The voice of the Lord divideth the flames of fire. The voice of the Lord shaketh the wilderness….The voice of the Lord . . . discovereth the forests Psalm 29: 3-9.
 
In these turbulent circumstances of life it is of para­mount importance that we be properly oriented. A Christian who is not sure of his position in the storm in relation to God is open to additional though unnecessary difficulties. He becomes an easy prey to the wiles of the enemy and a possible victim of the coun­sel of ignorant advisers.  In order to preclude any such eventuality one must turn to the repeated use of the phrase, “the voice of the Lord,” which occurs seven times. This might appear to be mere meaningless repetition in the eyes of the casual reader, yet this very repetition constitutes the heart of this remarkable Psalm and provides the key to the whole problem namely, that the storm is “the voice of the Lord”. God. wants us to know that He speaks in the storm., by means of the storm. 
 
Now it might be rightly asked, “What does God say in the storm?” In answer to this question another rep­etition must be observed. The name “Lord” is used eighteen times. The meaning of the name “Lord” as used in this Psalm is said to be, “He (who) is.” This is very suggestive and so appropriate because the enemy of our souls will seek to defeat us in the storm by casting an aspersion on God as regards His promises.
 
The, enemy, will endeavor to_ make us believe that God is the God who isn’t. But this Psalm declares God is “He who is.” “He who is divideth the flames of fire” (lit., “sendeth forth the lightnings”). “The voice of the He who is breaketh the cedars.” “The voice of the He who is is upon the waters,” etc. This repetition of “Lord” leads us to the primary cause of the storm – God, who seeks to reveal Himself as “the He (who) is.”
 
It must further be noted that there is a reference to God, not merely in every verse, but in every statement. Altogether there are twenty-two direct and two in­direct references to God. The entire Psalm is saturated with God, so to speak. What is the meaning of this? That God is in the storm; that He is He who is when it seems He isn’t. That He is in the lightning, in the thunder, in the water, in all. The Psalm, we repeat, is saturated with God; so is the experience. The believer in the storm, must see and believe that He who is sent it; that He who is is in it; and that He who is speaks by it.
  
 Not only does God send the storm; He comes with it. “The Lord sitteth upon the flood” (v. 10). This verse begins to throw some light on the purpose of the storm. Since God is pictured as sitting upon the flood, He evidently uses the flood as a means of conveyance, so that the flood of the storm which comes into the believer’s life brings God with it. This remains true, whether God’s purpose is to bring us more into the fellowship of the sufferings of Christ, as mentioned in Philippians 3:10, or God seeks to teach us lessons in order to give us a ministry of help and comfort to those in distress, as stated in 2 Corinthians 1:4, 5. This re­mains true, whether God needs to demonstrate to Satan that we serve Him because of what He means to us (and not merely because of what He does for us ) as illustrated in Job 1:1 to 2:10, or whether His purpose is to Enlarge our capacity and desire for Him.
      
 The storm will often effect this by tearing us loose from encumbrances that retard our progress, and from preoccupation with things that compete with God for our attention and affection. Thus the storm becomes a means whereby we are conditioned for a closer walk with God, as well as a medium of conveyance, bringing God with it. “The Lord hath his way in the whirlwind and in the storm, and the clouds are the dust of his feet” Nahum 1:3. After the sky has cleared and the flood has subsided, the trusting believer _will be con­scious of a fresh deposit of the reality of the presence of God in his heart, for “the Lord sitteth upon the flood.”
   
 “The Lord sitteth King forever” (v. 10). Hallelujah! Not only does He who is come with it and sit upon it; He sits upon it as King, as Ruler, as Sovereign. In other words, He controls the flood. The same Lord who uses the storm as a vehicle, who thus conveys Himself into the believer’s heart by a means and in a manner which probably could not be as well accomplished in any other way, exercises such a providential control that the flood, while it is great enough to accomplish His purpose, is not so great that the believer would be engulfed beyond his ability to stand it. “God is faithful, who will not suffer you to be tempted above that ye are able,” the apostle assures us. He who is is com­pletely Sovereign of the flood. He sits upon it, so He comes with it. He sits King, so He holds it in control. He sits King “forever,” so He is always in control. This is the believer’s assurance in the storm.
   
 “The Lord will give strength unto his people; the Lord will bless His people with peace” (v. 10). Strength and peace is the believer’s provision for the storm. God who sends the storm also grants the strength to endure it. He “will with the temptation also make a way to escape, that ye may be able to bear it” 1 Corinthians 10:13. This way of escape is not so much a deliverance from the storm as it is a deliverance in the storm.  The grace and strength of God enables us to bear the storm while the purpose of God is being accomplished.
   
This strength will be imparted as we wait upon Him, not as we wait for the sympathy of the people. “They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength” Isaiah 40:31. Waiting upon God is as indispensable (and as delightful) a Christian exercise as it ever was. There is no substitute. Israel complained in Isaiah 40:27 in the same manner in which a Christian might be tempted to complain in the storm: “My way is hid from the Lord, and my judgment is passed over from my God.” In other words, they complained that God does not see, God does not care; and as another version has it, “the justice due me is passed away.” This ques­tions the justice of God. There is great danger in such an attitude. The context uses the words “faint,” “weary,” and “fall.”
  
As far as the passage in Isaiah goes, this fainting, wearying and threatened falling is due to lack of con­fidence in the attributes of God Isaiah 40:28; failure to realize that God provides the ability to walk with Him Isaiah 40:29. We are doomed to failure, even at the height of our own resources Isaiah 40:30, unless we wait upon God for enabling by His strength. “The Lord will give strength unto his people.”
  
“They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles. . . .” It has been said that in an approaching storm all the birds will scurry for cover in fright, except the eagle. He will face the storm, with wings spread, and will allow the howling, contrary wind to carry him to great heights. This is the Christian’s privilege in the storm. Such an achievement takes the strength which only God can give; it requires spending time in waiting before Him. 

“The Lord will bless his people with peace” (v.11). This is the promise of a tranquil mind and heart in the middle of the storm. Peace not just after the storm, but during the storm. The kind of peace that Christ had when “he was in the hinder part of the ship, asleep on a pillow,” during a storm that filled the ship with water and threatened their lives (see Mark 4:38; Luke 8:23). Let it be noted that these disciples were in the will of God, despite wind, waves, and danger; for they had obeyed His command, “Let us go over unto the other side of the lake.” Our very obedience to God may lead us into a storm which   we would not otherwise experience, but it also leads to a compensating revela­tion of His power which we would not otherwise ex­perience either.  

 

 

 

The peace of God is not something negative, not a mere absence of disturbance. It is something positive -the conscious presence of a supernatural calm pro­duced in our hearts by the Spirit. This peace is “not as the world giveth”; it is not dependent on favorable circumstances. In fact, it is independent of both favor­able and unfavorable circumstances alike. In short, it is truly His peace, the peace of God.
 
This peace acts as an insulator, as a defense against, the disturbance of the storm. The strength of the Lord enables us to bear the pressure of the storm, but the peace of God which passes all understanding (and all misunderstanding too) keeps the disturbing elements of the outer storm from penetrating our being.

This twin provision of strength and peace logically leads to the consideration of our activity in the storm.
 
“Give unto the Lord glory and strength. Give unto the Lord the glory due unto his name; worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness” (vv. 1, 2). This then should be our activity in the storm- to give unto the Lord worship, to give Him glory. The angels are doing it. “. . . And in his temple doth every one speak of His glory” (v. 9). In any  storm God calls for worship; we owe it to Him.
 
“Give unto the Lord, O ye mighty,” Who are the mighty in the storm? Those who know that it is the”stormy wind fulfilling His word” (Psalm 148:8); those who see God in the storm and wait upon Him for strength. They are called upon to give Him strength, to attribute and contribute, to give Him the fruit of the strength He gave them, even praise in the midst of   the storm, and despite the storm- and even because of the storm. The mighty in His strength will give Him glory and praise while they behold the effects, of the storm, the broken cedars of their fondest hopes. They, worship the Lord in the beauty of holiness without charging God foolishly, though their hearts are oppressed with a terrible sense of loneliness. They may feel as bleak within as is the desolation without.
    
Though the spirit may ‘be crushed, and the will may falter because the future may seem empty, God calls for worship with repeated emphasis. “Give unto the Lord,” He calls, “Give unto the Lord.” Faith will re­spond and say, “It is the voice of the Lord in the storm; therefore will I join the angels giving God glory!”  
http://www.alaskandreams.net/ekklesia/articles.htm
  
 God in these days also is still speaking to us not just through the words in His Bible.   “You are not to go to the left or to the right unless you hear a voice ( of the Holy Sprit) saying this is the way walk there in”.. Many of us have not learned as to how to hear this voice .  

 http://postedat.wordpress.com/2008/06/22/as-to-what-is-a-christian/

 

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About thenonconformer

I am a Canadian, retired and I do have an Engineering degree, from Concordia University , Montreal 1968, plus I had also now worked as a Re/Max Realtor in Calgary too.
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One Response to joy cometh in the morning.

  1. Be sure the devil will still try to get you away from God’s truths as ASAP and anyway he can..

    http://postedat.wordpress.com/2008/09/19/dispensationalists-it-seems-to-compensate-for-their-often-rejections/

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